SRC: Science Life

Using health insurance claims data from more than 480,000 people in nearly 130,000 families, researchers at the University of Chicago have created a new classification of common diseases based on how often they occur among genetically-related individuals.

Researchers hope the work, published this week in Nature Genetics, will help physicians make better diagnoses and treat root causes instead of symptoms.

Understanding genetic similarities between diseases may mean that drugs that are effective for one disease may be effective for another one,” said Andrey Rzhetsky, PhD, the Edna K. Papazian Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics at UChicago who was the paper’s senior author. “And for those diseases with a large environmental component, that means we can perhaps prevent them by changing the environment.”

The results of the study suggest that standard disease classifications–called nosologies–based on symptoms or anatomy may miss connections between diseases with the same underlying causes. For example, the new study showed that migraine, typically classified as a disease of the central nervous system, appeared to be most genetically similar to irritable bowel syndrome, an inflammatory disorder of the intestine.

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