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Annual Report
DOM Women's Committee newsletter
Eileen Dolan, PhD
Robert Grossman, PhD
Precision Medicine

 
 

NEWS

  • Julian Solway, MD

    Julian Solway, MD Featured in an interview in The Translational Scientist

    Sitting Down With… Julian Solway MD, Walter L. Palmer Distinguished Service Professor - Medicine and Pediatrics, Director - Institute for Translational Medicine, Dean for Translational Medicine, University of Chicago, USA.

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  • AbbVie, University of Chicago collaborate to advance cancer research

    Chicago and North Chicago, Ill., April 20, 2016 – The University of Chicago and AbbVie (NYSE: ABBV), a global biopharmaceutical company, have entered into a five-year collaboration agreement designed to improve the pace of discovery and advance medical research in oncology at both organizations.

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  • Jesse Hall, MD

    Jesse Hall, MD to receive ATS Lifetime Achievement Award

    Jesse Hall, MD, Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine) has been chosen by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Assembly on Critical Care Awards Selection Committee to receive the 8th Annual Lifetime Achievement Award. This award recognizes Dr. Hall’s career devoted to research and teaching of the science and practice of critical care medicine as well as outstanding service to the Assembly on Critical Care. Dr. Hall will be honored at the ATS International Conference in San Francisco on May 16, 2016.

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  • Precision medicine brings new hope to those with advanced urothelial cancer

    Five of six patients with advanced metastatic urothelial cancer and at least one of two specific genetic abnormalities, responded to treatment with afatinib, which was approved in 2013 by the Food and Drug Administration for patients with lung cancer, researchers report online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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  • Sleep-deprived teens may have more diabetes risk factors

    Teens who sleep less than eight hours at night are more likely to have fat around the midsection and to be resistant to insulin, which can eventually lead to type 2 diabetes, according to a new study.

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  • Better inhaler lessons can prevent asthma emergencies

    A major weakness of asthma care is that many patients don’t know how to use inhalers to deliver life-saving medicine when they’re gasping for air. The fix may be as simple as taking more time to teach patients how the devices work, a U.S. study suggests.

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  • Generating enthusiasm for generic drugs with a project called IMPROVE

    Generic drugs are virtually identical to their brand-name counterparts. They contain the same active ingredients, dosage form, strength, quality, safety, performance, route of administration, and use. The United States Food and Drug Association (FDA) describes generic drugs as “bioequivalent.”

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  • Newly Designed Department of Medicine: Women's Committee Website

    The Department of Medicine is proud to present the new and updated Women's Committee Website

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  • Shared decision-making can improve health care outcomes for LGBTQ patients of color

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) patients who are also racial and ethnic minorities suffer significant health disparities, while facing more complicated challenges than white LGBTQ or racial and ethnic minority patients alone. These identities can operate independently or together to influence the patient’s relationship with health care providers and their decisions about care.

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  • Sleep loss boosts hunger and unhealthy food choices

    Skimping on sleep has long been associated with overeating, poor food choices and weight gain. Now a new study shows how sleep loss initiates this process, amplifying and extending blood levels of a chemical signal that enhances the joy of eating, particularly the guilty pleasures gained from sweet or salty, high-fat snack foods.

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  • Pritzker School of Medicine program ranks 11th in latest survey

    The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine earned a No. 11 spot in the latest edition of U.S. News & World Report's "Best Graduate Schools," continuing its status as one of the country's best training grounds for future physicians.

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  • Arlene Chapman, MD

    Arlene Chapman, MD- Elected to AAP

    Arlene Chapman, MD, Professor of Medicine and Chief , Section of Nephrology has been elected to the prestigious Association of American Physicians (AAP) . This honor recognizes Dr. Chapman’s important contributions as a leader in polycystic kidney disease and hypertension where she has significantly improved the lives of patients with these diseases.

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  • Sleep loss boosts hunger and unhealthy food choices

    Skimping on sleep has long been associated with overeating, poor food choices and weight gain. Now a new study shows how sleep loss initiates this process, amplifying and extending blood levels of a chemical signal that enhances the joy of eating, particularly the guilty pleasures gained from sweet or salty, high-fat snack foods.

    More...

  • 2016 Janet D. Rowley Research Day Abstract Winners

    The second  annual  Janet D. Rowley Research Day was an overwhelming success. The day kicked off with an  outstanding talk on cancer genomics by Elaine Mardis ,PhD , the Robert E. and Louise F. Dunn Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine  Following that, 104  junior faculty and fellows participated in the poster event, with all subspecialties represented.

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  • Arlene Chapman, MD

    Arlene Chapman, MD to Receive 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Polycystic Kidney Disease Foundation

    Arlene Chapman, MD, Professor of Medicine and Chief, Section of Nephrology has been selected as a 2016 Lifetime Achievement Awardee by the Polycystic Kidney Disease Foundation (PKF) in recognition of her of dedication to improving the lives of patients with polycystic kidney disease. Dr. Chapman will honored at the PKF’s annual benefit on April 9, 2016 at the Fairmont Chicago.

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  • Francis Alenghat, MD, PhD

    Connective tissue disease increases risk for cardiovascular problems

    A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death.

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  • Karen Kim, MD

    Recipient of Chicago Foundation for Women Impact 2016 Award

    Karen Kim, MD, Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition), Dean for Faculty Affairs and Director of the UCCCC Office of Community Engagement and Cancer, has been named as one of three recipients of the Impact 2016 Award by the Chicago Foundation for Women.

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  • Eve Van Cauter, PhD

    Eve Van Cauter, PhD- To Receive Department of Medicine Distinguished Service Award

    In recognition of her outstanding contributions to the clinical, research and educational missions of the Department of Medicine, Eve Van Cauter, PhD, the Frederick H. Rawson Professor (Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism) and Director, Sleep, Metabolism and Health Center has been selected as the recipient of the 2016 Department of Medicine Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Van Cauter will be recognized at Medicine Grand Rounds on Tuesday, February 9,2016 at noon in P117.

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  • DOM Faculty named as Chicago's 'Top Doctors'

    31 Department of Medicine faculty have been recognized as Chicago's 'Top Doctors' in a ranking by Chicago magazine. A total of 88 physicians at the University of Chicago Medicine and Comer Children's Hospital are among the 355 "outstanding metro-area doctors" named in the January 2016 issue. Honorees were nominated by physicians nationwide who were asked to consider such factors as clinical excellence, bedside manner, education and board certification.

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  • Making big data personal: An app that tracks how you really feel

    The average person spends almost three hours each day on mobile devices like smartphones and the apps that come with them, market data shows. That’s equal to the total amount of time we spend on desktops and laptops and other mobile devices combined. After all that time that you invest in your phone, what if it cared about how you felt and scientifically evaluated your health? What if it could help you feel better?

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  • Genes that increase breast cancer risk also tied to risk of leukemia after treatment

    A new analysis, published early online Dec. 7, 2015, in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, points to characteristics that may increase a breast cancer survivor’s risk of developing leukemia after undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation.

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  • 4 Department of Medicine Faculty Receive Named Professorships

    University President Robert Zimmer recently announced 4 named professorships granted to Department of Medicine faculty effective January 1, 2016.

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  • The software that will give scientists a better view of metagenomic data

    In 2014, A. Murat Eren, PhD, who goes by Meren, had the beginnings of a promising career: an appointment as an Assistant Research Scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Mass., and an opportunity to continue doing what he did well: studying communities of microbes using computer algorithms he developed himself. But in 2014 he decided to stop doing that and write a new software platform instead.

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  • New test may improve diagnosis and treatment of pancreatobiliary cancer

    By collecting samples from the portal vein—which carries blood from the gastrointestinal tract, including from the pancreas, to the liver—physicians can learn far more about a patient’s pancreatic cancer than by relying on peripheral blood from a more easily accessed vein in the arm.

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  • Gut bacteria can dramatically amplify cancer immunotherapy

    By introducing a particular strain of bacteria into the digestive tracts of mice with melanoma, researchers at the University of Chicago were able to boost the ability of the animal’s immune systems to attack tumor cells. The gains were comparable to treatment with anti-cancer drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors, such as anti-PD-L1 antibodies.

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  • UChicago-led team creates potential new approach for early detection of blood cancer

    New research published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences may eventually help doctors diagnose myelodysplastic syndromes, a group of blood disorders, earlier and without performing an often-painful bone marrow biopsy.

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  • New grant helps Pritzker launch program to reshape future of medical education

    The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine will redevelop aspects of its curriculum so each student learns elements of health care delivery science, an emerging field that studies the intersection of scientific research and the day-to-day delivery of health care.

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  • National study lowers guidelines for managing blood pressure

    Two University of Chicago physician researchers contributed to the largest NIH study ever to evaluate whether lower blood pressure than previously recommended for certain patient groups reduces the risk of heart and kidney disease, stroke, and age-related memory decline.

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EVENTS

  • 05
    MAY

    Named Professor Lecture Series - “Statistics, Item Response Theory, and
    My Time in The Cook County Jail”

    Presented by:

    Robert Gibbons, PHD


    May 5, 2016
    924 E, 57th Street, RM 115 @ 5PM

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  • 06
    MAY

    13th Ultmann Chicago Lymphoma Symposium Diagnosis and Management of Lymphoma

    The International Ultmann Chicago Lymphoma Symposium (IUCLS) is an annual conference dedicated solely to the science and clinical care of lymphoma. It has been organized to honor the achievements of Dr. John Ultmann, a pioneer in the treatment of lymphoma, who devoted his life to the understanding of this disease. He was particularly known for his work on the staging of Hodgkin lymphoma and the utility of staging as a guide for treatment.

    May 06, 2016
    12pm-3:00p.m.

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  • 07
    MAY

    11th Annual Chicago Diabetes Day

    We are pleased to announce the 11th Annual
    Chicago Diabetes Day that will take place
    on Saturday May 7th, 2016. This conference
    is intended to serve as a forum for basic
    and clinical investigators, clinicians, and
    pharmaceutical industry personnels in Chicago
    and the Midwest to meet, share information,
    and discuss common interests with the goal of
    fostering collaborations between individuals
    and between institutions. Ample opportunities
    will exist throughout the day to meet with your
    colleagues. A poster session is planned for those
    who wish to share findings from current basic,
    clinical, or translational research. The top eight
    posters will receive an award of $100 each.

    May 07, 2016
    8:30 a.m.-2:00p.m.

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  • 12
    MAY

    11th annual Quality and Safety Symposium

    The University of Chicago Medicine’s 11th Annual Quality & Safety Symposium will be held Thursday, May 12, 2016. This annual event brings together University of Chicago Medicine faculty and staff to recognize the ongoing commitment to providing quality patient care through a number of exciting opportunities, and now’s the time for you to prepare to participate.

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  • 20
    MAY

    The Eleanor Humphreys’ Lecture and Symposium: Honoring Vinay Kumar’s Five Decades Advancing Pathology, Research, and Education


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  • 29
    SEP

    John and Joyce Benfield Lecture in Thoracic Surgery

    Speaker:

    Shaf Keshavjee, MD, MSc, FRCSC, FACS
    University of Toronto
    Toronto, Canada


    5:00 PM
    Thursday, September 29, 2016
    Billings Auditorium P-117


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MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

Welcome to the Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago. Our Department was the first department created when the medical school began over 80 years ago. It has evolved into the largest department not only in the medical school with over 345 full time faculty and research faculty but is the largest department in the University. The main missions of the Department of Medicine, scholarship, discovery, education and outstanding patient care, occur in a setting of multicultural and ethnic diversity. These missions are supported by exceptional faculty and trainees in the department. We believe you will quickly agree that the DOM's faculty, fellows and trainees very much represent the forefront of academic medicine –extraordinary people doing things to support the missions of our department. The result is a Department which reaches far beyond the walls of our medical school to improve humanity and health throughout our community and the world providing high quality patient care – and training of the next generation of leaders in medicine.